Matter of Fact Monday: Angels

Matter of Fact Monday
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The Angels were an American girl group, best-known for their 1963 number 1 hit, “My Boyfriend’s Back”.

The Angels are a hard rock band that formed in Adelaide, Australia in 1970. The band later relocated from Adelaide to Sydney and enjoyed huge local success until well into the 1990s. For the purposes of international release, their records were released under the names Angel City and later The Angels From Angel City. From 2001 to 2007, the band’s former members have toured and recorded under various names including Members of the Angels and The Original Angels Band. In 2006, The Angels were featured on a postage stamp for Australia Post as part of their “Australian Rock Posters, The Stamps” collection.

An angel is a spiritual supernatural being found in many religions. Although the nature of angels and the tasks given to them vary from tradition to tradition, in Christianity, Judaism and Islam, they often act as messengers from God. Other roles in religious traditions include acting as warrior or guard; the concept of a “guardian angel” is popular in modern Western culture.

Matter of Fact Monday: Thanksgiving

Matter of Fact Monday
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Three places in the United States named after the holiday’s traditional main course. Turkey, Texas, was the most populous in 2006, with 489 residents; followed by Turkey Creek, La. (363); and Turkey, N.C. (270). There also are nine townships around the country named Turkey, three in Kansas.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/010315.html, http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/BasicFactsServlet

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Eight places and townships in the United States that are named Cranberry or some spelling variation of the red, acidic berry (e.g., Cranbury, N.J.), a popular side dish at Thanksgiving. Cranberry township (Butler County), Pa., was the most populous of these places in 2006, with 27,509 residents. Cranberry township (Venango County), Pa., was next (6,900)

Source: Population estimates http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/BasicFactsServlet, http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/010315.html.

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Twenty Eight places in the United States named Plymouth, as in Plymouth Rock, the landing site of the first Pilgrims. Plymouth, Minn., is the most populous, with 70,102 residents in 2006; Plymouth, Mass., had 55,516. Speaking of Plymouth Rock, there is just one township in the United States named “Pilgrim.” Located in Dade County, Mo., its population was 135.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/010315.html, http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/BasicFactsServlet

Matter of Fact Monday: Fruit

Matter of Fact Monday
Fruit Facts – Strawberries

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Did you know that strawberries:
~ were cultivated in ancient Rome!
~were used as a medicinal herb in the 13th century?
~are not really a fruit or a berry but the enlarged receptacle of the flower?
~are grown in every state in the U.S. and every province in Canada?
~are a member of the Rose family!
~have a museum dedicated to them in Belgium?
~were first cultivated back in the 16th and 17th centuries!
~are very high in vitamin C, potassium, and antioxidants?

Matter of Fact Monday: Presidents

Matter of Fact Monday
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The oldest president inaugurated was Reagan (age 69); the youngest was Kennedy (age 43). Theodore Roosevelt, however, was the youngest man to become president——he was 42 when he succeeded McKinley, who had been assassinated.

The tallest president was Lincoln at 6’4″; at 5’4″, Madison was the shortest.

14 presidents served as vice presidents: J. Adams, Jefferson, Van Buren, Tyler, Fillmore, A. Johnson, Arthur, T. Roosevelt, Coolidge, Truman, Nixon, L. Johnson, Ford, and George Bush.

Matter of Fact Monday: Witchcraft

Matter of Fact Monday
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“Witchcraft” is a popular song from 1957 composed by Cy Coleman with lyrics by Carolyn Leigh. It was released as a single by Frank Sinatra, and reached number twenty in the U.S., spending sixteen weeks on the charts .

Witchcraft (from Old English “sorcery , necromancy”), in various historical, anthropological, religious and mythological contexts, is the use of certain kinds of supernatural or magical powers.

Witchcraft is the first in a series of horror thriller films. The film was directed by Rob Spera from a screenplay written by Jody Savin. The film starred Anat Topol, Gary Sloan, Mary Shelley (actress), Elizabeth Stocton, Deborah Scott, Alexander Kirkwood, Lee Kissman, and Ross Newton. The movie was released on video in 1988, and re-released October 15, 1997, on DVD.

Matter of Fact Monday: Sky

Matter of Fact Monday
Hosted at http://matteroffactmonday.blogspot.com/
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I found some beautiful sky photos!

pink sky Pictures, Images and Photos

September Sky Pictures, Images and Photos

2008.10.18_sky Pictures, Images and Photos

Matter of Fact Monday: Baseball

Matter of Fact Monday
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1. Baseball fan and comedian George Carlin states it this way: “In baseball the object is to go home.” It can’t get much simpler than that (though while playing the game is simple, laying out the field is another matter). Yet when one attempts to determine what players are the most skilled at “going home”, or are the most talented at helping their teammates “go home”, obtaining answers isn’t so simple.

2. Babe Ruth wore a cabbage leaf under his cap while playing baseball, and he used to changed it every two innings.

3. The starting point for much of the action on the field is home plate, which is an irregular white rubber pentagon 17 inches by 8 1/2 by 12 by 12 by 8 1/2 inches (defined in the rule book as a one-foot square with “two of the corners filled in”). Adjacent to each of the two parallel 8 1/2-inch sides is a batter’s box. The point of home plate where the two 12-inch sides meet at right angles, is at one corner of a ninety-foot square. The other three corners of the square, in counterclockwise order from home plate, are called first base, second base, and third base. Three canvas bags fifteen inches (38 cm) square mark the three bases. These three bags along with home plate form the four bases at the corners of the infield.